Paddock ParadiseThis is a featured page

Creation of this wiki site was inspired by Jaime Jackson's 2006 book, Paddock Paradise. From the back cover:


Based on Jackson's legendary research on wild horses, Paddock Paradise is a revolutionary model for safe, natural horsekeeping, hoof care, and the healing and rehabilitation of lame horses. The premise of Paddock Paradise is to stimulate horses to behave and move naturally according to their instincts. "This is the key," according to Jackson, "to having physically and mentally healthier horses." This unique and unprecedented model is adaptable to virtually all size horse properties, regardless of climate, and fits all equine breeds regardless of how they are used. Consider some of the following benefits for creating a Paddock Paradise for your horses:

Pokey Walks the Track- Encourages constant movement, as nature intended

- Greater movement means natural hoof wear with fewer bills

- Protects horses from dangerous founder-prone pastures

- Minimizes the need for warm-up exercise time before riding

- Helps address neurotic behavior by providing natural outlets

- Provides an effective means for diet and weight management

- Adaptable for breeding, foaling, multiple horse operations

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JoAnn Johnson created this site to help bring together a community of horse owners interested in using track systems and natural boarding. Please feel free to jump in with your ideas, questions, and experience. Site members (membership is free) can use the discussion forum, add pictures, text, and even add more pages.
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Read about the construction of a Paddock Paradise in
Wales.

Poll: How wide is your turnout track?

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Paddock Paradise boarding facilities we've "herd" about:

http://abidingacresinc.web.officelive.com/default.aspx - Abiding Acres in Oregon

Blue Heron Farm (south of Nashville, TN). I keep open 1 spot for hoof rehab cases only.

http://www.naturalhorsemanagement.com/1.html -- A British "yard" that is offering Paddock Paradise boarding

http://www.equiloha.com/naturalboarding.html -- Paddock Paradise natural boarding on Kauai, Hawaii




TheNaturalFeeder
TheNaturalFeeder
Latest page update: made by TheNaturalFeeder , Aug 28 2010, 7:48 AM EDT (about this update About This Update TheNaturalFeeder Edited by TheNaturalFeeder


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Started By Thread Subject Replies Last Post
Hubbardshorses Is it possible to make a paradise on only an acre of land?? 11 Nov 27 2012, 3:20 AM EST by ElizabethPA
Thread started: Apr 30 2010, 7:58 AM EDT  Watch
HI I just found this site last week and I find it very fascinating! I have two horses and only have 1 acre that is my property. My next door neighbor allows me to let my boys graze on her acre. I only can make fencing alterations to my acre. Do you think it is possible to still make a lap from the barn and back around.And use slow hay feeders in tree areas to keep them moving? I'm starting to have wheels turn in my head after looking at everyone's Paddock Paradise. I made my own slow feeding hay nets last weekend and my boys already have adjusted. They aren't crying out to me as soon as I get home for the feeding like they used too. They are also eating 2 flakes of hay for several hours now than 1 1/2 - 2 hours. I'm really impressed!! And to think I put in a google search for hay nets and I found this site. I had no clue this was out here. :) Thank you for any tips.. I live in East Texas with pine trees and sandy soil. Dry hooves are a problem in my existing paddock.
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Rustypenny which type of electrical fencing is best (page: 1 2) 31 May 7 2012, 12:01 PM EDT by steveb12
Thread started: Feb 9 2011, 1:02 PM EST  Watch
Hi everyone,

First off, I just want to say how thrilled I am. Our paddock area is a total quagmire. YUK! I was totally stressing about it and couldn't sleep. I found this site at 2:30 in the morning. It seems this may be the solution we have been looking for. I have a pony and one horse. We have about 5 acres, with the majority being wooded. The small acreage plans have been really helpful.

I am relatively new to the horse world, 3 years. Some of my questions may seem odd to those of you who have had horses your whole life. Just bear with me. ;)

I have walked my property and have laid out a track system. It is hard trying to keep it simple. There are so many options. Anyway, I am going out to purchase the fencing next week. My husband has always used split rail, and wooden post with welded wire. Being that this is my project, I have decided to use an electric fencing system. Waaay more economical than split rail. I have never used any type of electric fence, nor have I installed any. My friend says it's really easy, hopefully she is right. :)
Anyway, my question is what type of fencing, rope or ribbon? Is there a brand that you guys have found is more durable than another? I want it to be cost effective, but not cheap. Which type of posts? Step ins look super easy. Are there some that are more durable than others? We are probably going with a solar powered system. I saw one at a supply store for $189. We only have 5 acres, so it's not like I need a really powerful system. Is the solar powered system worth the investment? Is there one that you guys would recommend?

Sorry for all of the questions. I want to do it right the first time around. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Susan.
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waymire pp design help please 3 Aug 2 2011, 1:49 PM EDT by waymire
Thread started: Aug 1 2011, 1:26 PM EDT  Watch
I have read many examples of pp design on dozens on different websites and am trying to design one for my situation. I have about 2 acres of usable space but it is arranged badly because the property was set up in a traditional stable design originally built in the 1940's. I also have the added issue of having to run two herds due to individual needs of the horses. While I have seen a few examples of "maze" designs, including on the diagrams here, the general advice is not to use one, however I cannot find any explanation of why not. My primary concern at this point is to increase movement, I really do not care about conservation of grass, and I have very limited space to work with. I have tried to figure out a way to do a continuous loop design, but it does not appear to be possible while maintaining usability of the necessary areas of my property (wash racks, feed storage, manure access and disposal, vehicle access to the barn etc). I have a large outdoor arena and a 70' round pen on two sides of my property which would lend themselves well to rolling/running/turnaround areas. The remaining areas are quite small however, and if I track around them the actual track would be tiny with larger grass areas in the middle. When turned into grass areas (as they are now) most of my horses go into "couch potato" mode and simply stand around all day. These areas would also then be too small to crossfence and rotate, resulting in eventual dirt yards anyway.

Logic is telling me to simply maze these areas, increasing my track length by 4-5x and making movement necessary throughout the day, ending in the arena or round pen for each herd. One side would encompass the old parking lot from when the barn was open to the public, providing great gravel for hoof conditioning. I could rotate the herds from one side to the other when I clean (once or twice a week) to get both herds into this area. see reply for more..
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Keyword tags: pasture paradise design
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