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SpottedTApps
SpottedTApps
20. RE: Pea Gravel
May 13 2009, 4:21 AM EDT | Post edited: May 13 2009, 4:21 AM EDT
What exactly IS the crusher run? It looks like it packs down pretty well, may be something I'd be interested in for other parts of the track.

I had the dirt guy leave me a pile of pea gravel to use in my 2 pens by the barn. I've put about 6 wheel barrels full just inside the gate of my broodmare's pen. My colt thinks it's the neatest stuff! He paws in it and likes to run and stop hard in it. He's a goof ball.
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pawsplus
pawsplus
21. RE: Pea Gravel
May 13 2009, 5:17 AM EDT | Post edited: May 13 2009, 5:17 AM EDT
"What exactly IS the crusher run? It looks like it packs down pretty well, may be something I'd be interested in for other parts of the track. "
Crusher run (or crush and run) is a combo of medium-large gravel and gravel dust. So it does pack down well over time. You can't use it in REALLY muddy areas unless you use a lot b/c the dust part will just get sucked down into the mud. But it's cheaper than straight gravel and works great in many applications. :-)

Elizabeth
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Wildridge
Wildridge
22. RE: Pea Gravel
May 13 2009, 2:25 PM EDT | Post edited: May 13 2009, 2:25 PM EDT
The crush and run (thanks Pawsplus for reminding me just how much Southern slang/draw one picks up over time...sounds normal after so many years) can pack down very hard. In our application, we actually had a roller machine pack it down. The gentleman who hauled for us already had the roller machine (he use to do asphalt paving) & offered to let us use it. :-) The crush and run ran about $10/ton. I think we had 20+ tons hauled in (2 small truck loads) around the barn. I'm hoping to have an area of pea gravel at some point down the road along with a sand pit as well (two different areas). Ann 1  out of 1 found this valuable. Do you?    
lindszoo
lindszoo
23. RE: Pea Gravel
May 14 2009, 11:50 AM EDT | Post edited: May 14 2009, 11:50 AM EDT
Anyone heard of Squegee (SP)? My farrier suggested this as an alternative to the pea gravel, cheaper. He is a barefoot trimmer and this is what he used. It is about the same size but contains sand. Anyway, ordered it and it should be here today or tomorrow. I have decided to put it in the 3 new stalls and under the overhang on the barn. Will get pictures posted as soon as it is done.
Lindsay
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SapphireSky
SapphireSky
24. RE: Pea Gravel
May 15 2009, 9:41 AM EDT | Post edited: May 15 2009, 9:41 AM EDT
I am very new and just signed up. I hope I can jump in and ask a related question as I am considering to do the same for our place. Anyone know how deep pea gravel should be? I am planning to let the horses eat down the grass to dirt then add geotextile fabric over the dirt then finally add pea gravel. I read somewhere that it should be 4 to 6 inches deep. I am thinking of 2 to 4 inches deep but I am afraid that horses may tear up the fabric underneath? Also wouldnt pea gravel be too shifty and soft at 4 to 6 inches deep? I asked a local rock guy about getting pea gravel for the corral and he said he thinks pea gravel is too dangerous and horses may accidently eat it. Also it is too shifty and not stable for horses to walk or run on. He recommended 3/8 inches crushed gravel with sand mixed in (I am in Colorado and he called this granite sand. Lindsay- it sure sounds like what you described as squeqee?). He said this would pack down nicely. What do you guys think? Also is there any harm to putting gravel in the entire corral where the horses will eat, sleep and exercise in? We dont have pasture but we do have a large public riding arena which is just dirt for the horses to run in. If I need to create a new post, please let me know. Thanks. :) Do you find this valuable?    
SpottedTApps
SpottedTApps
25. RE: Pea Gravel
May 15 2009, 10:16 AM EDT | Post edited: May 15 2009, 10:16 AM EDT
My understanding is that the whole point of pea gravel is to put it thick so that they are not stepping down flat footed on the ground. It offers a type of support. Also, that it then massages the bottom of the foot, where packed gravel would not, it would just offer a hard, rough surface for them to walk on.

Mine is about 4" thick, but it is on cement wash out, not geotextile fabric. That may have something to do with the "slippery-ness" because I don't find mine to be at all slippery, but then it isn't on a smooth surface.
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lindszoo
lindszoo
26. RE: Pea Gravel
May 15 2009, 5:21 PM EDT | Post edited: May 15 2009, 5:21 PM EDT
As it turns out I ended up getting the pea gravel. I am in Colorado also....... Parker. I know I am going to regret not putting down any kind of fabric first but that's just the way it turned out. I have been doing a lot of work and trying to get things done in order didn't work out too well. Anyway..... I had some leftover and put it in front of my new automatic waterers and when I looked out an hour late 3 horses were just standing on the gravel relaxing!!!!! Will try and post pictures and more info tomorrow. I also ended up doing 4 inches deep to allow for some packing down. Do you find this valuable?    
SapphireSky
SapphireSky
27. RE: Pea Gravel
May 16 2009, 6:39 AM EDT | Post edited: May 16 2009, 6:39 AM EDT
Oh you are from Colorado too! Where did you buy the pea gravel from and are they rounded or crushed? How much are they by the ton? I am still comparing prices and would appreciate any help in the right direction! Thanks. How big of an area did you put the gravel over? Have the horses run on it yet? Do you find that the gravel stays put? What about wheelbarrow? Is it hard to push one through? Do you find this valuable?    
SpottedTApps
SpottedTApps
28. RE: Pea Gravel
May 27 2009, 5:35 AM EDT | Post edited: May 27 2009, 5:35 AM EDT
OK, so I've had my pea gravel for a couple of weeks. The horses still love it. They are not tender on it at all. We are now smack dab into wet season and my mare with the most sensitive feet? Still has sensitive feet. She is fine on the pea gravel, but as soon as she hits hard ground she is hobbling. I had hoped the pea gravel would help her out, but that doesn't seem the case so far.
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pawsplus
pawsplus
29. RE: Pea Gravel
May 27 2009, 5:58 AM EDT | Post edited: May 27 2009, 5:58 AM EDT
"OK, so I've had my pea gravel for a couple of weeks. The horses still love it. They are not tender on it at all. We are now smack dab into wet season and my mare with the most sensitive feet? Still has sensitive feet. She is fine on the pea gravel, but as soon as she hits hard ground she is hobbling. I had hoped the pea gravel would help her out, but that doesn't seem the case so far.
"
How long it will take depends on WHY her feet are sensitive, what the trim is like, what she is eating, etc. :-) I.e., is she sensitive b/c she has contracted feet? Or b/c she has flat soles? B/c her toe callus was previously rasped off (hopefully is not being done now)? The best thing for contracted feet, for instance, is lots of walking on asphalt, in boots if that's what it takes to get a heel-first landing. But ANY change in the feet takes many months, often years. Takes 9 mos or so to grow a new hoof capsule. :-)

Elizabeth
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SpottedTApps
SpottedTApps
30. RE: Pea Gravel
May 29 2009, 4:14 AM EDT | Post edited: May 29 2009, 4:14 AM EDT
This mare has always had tender soles. She's very flat footed. I've owned her for 10 years now and region, living conditions, farrier, feed, supplements... nothing makes a difference. I was surprised to see her enjoying the pea gravel as she avoids all rocks in all shapes and sizes, but she likes the pea gravel.
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Rose66
Rose66
31. RE: Pea Gravel
Jul 10 2009, 11:21 AM EDT | Post edited: Jul 10 2009, 11:21 AM EDT
I had 15 tons of pea gravel delivered this morning and I've been spreading it all day using our front end loader. Well, actually, I have been "moving" it from the location it was dumped in to the location that I want it spread out. I had the driver dump it next to our driveway because I didn't want the big dump truck making huge ruts in the yard trying to get to the barn to dump the gravel closer to where I am putting it. I think I now have enough moved to the area and now I just need to get it spread out a little more. I will post before and after pictures as soon as I get a chance. My horses have walked around in it smelling of it and I'm sure wondering, "what is mom up to now???" My yearling loves it the most. He buries his nose in it and then pushes it around while snorting.
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tangledmanes
tangledmanes
32. RE: Pea Gravel
Jul 11 2009, 2:35 AM EDT | Post edited: Jul 11 2009, 2:35 AM EDT
I priced the pea gravel yesterday; it's $28/yard or $235 for an 8-yard truckload delivered here. I'm anxious to cover several sections of my Paddock Paradise with it. This Alabama sand really blows around; their paths don't pack down like the dirt did in NY. The gravel will minimize the flying dust and keep the ground in place. I even dug up and moved with my precious rectangle of road fabric, to re-use under the pea gravel in one spot (will have to find more road fabric, too). But before we can get the gravel up the dirt lane I live on, I may first have to buy a load of crusher run driveway gravel for the road. That's turning into a sand pit and already threatening to swallow up my little car. :-0 I'm having them come out to give me an estimate on fixing the road next week -- then we'll see if that's the tipping point for us to get a tractor right away...

JoAnn
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Rose66
Rose66
33. RE: Pea Gravel
Aug 20 2009, 4:45 PM EDT | Post edited: Aug 20 2009, 4:45 PM EDT
Okay, ya'll, I'm in love with my pea gravel !!! My horse's hooves have improved in several ways since they have been walking on the gravel. First off, they are doing a lot of trimming themselves. The gravel keeps their soles sloughed off to just good sole, no white chalky dead sole on them. Their feet almost never have any manure or dirt packed around the frog anymore. My one horse who used to keep a small case of ongoing thrush no matter how often his feet were picked no longer has thrush! And all their hooves have widened in the heel area. And talk about hard! When I trimmed them last week, all their hooves had hardened up tremendously!!! Of course that makes it MUCH harder on me to trim them but it's worth it. All of my horses can now gallop through the gravel and never miss a beat now. I am going to make a connecting lane soon between two paddocks and I plan on putting down some crusher run on the whole lane and then once it packs down, I'll probably spread a thin layer of #57 gravel which will help them even more toward having tough as nail hooves.

JoAnn, good luck on dealing with Alabama sand. My land is sandy too so I chose to put down fabric to keep my pea gravel from disappearing into the sand but so far it has worked great. There are some places where the fabric has come through but I just rake the gravel back over it every so often and it seems to be fine. Did you get your drive way fixed?
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tangledmanes
tangledmanes
34. RE: Pea Gravel
Aug 20 2009, 6:24 PM EDT | Post edited: Aug 20 2009, 6:24 PM EDT
Rose, I envy your pea gravel! Thanks for posting about the results -- FANTASTIC! Can't wait to see pictures.

How wide are your pea gravel paths?

I've put a little driveway gravel along a 40' section of trail in my Paddock Paradise. (& learned that I can get my truck in with a yard at a time.) It's only about a foot wide but is a narrow path between bushes and the fence. Combined with our new hoof pond, it's making a difference, but doesn't have the polishing effect of pea gravel.

I'm still working on a plan for my driveway and private road. I requested some advice from the county engineers. Thanks for asking. I'll post more about it when I know more. :-)

JoAnn
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SpottedTApps
SpottedTApps
35. RE: Pea Gravel
Aug 21 2009, 5:20 AM EDT | Post edited: Aug 21 2009, 5:20 AM EDT
Well my tender foot mare I had posted about is worse than ever with wet season on us. She can hardly walk. So I'll probably break down and put front shoes on her at least. I feel horrible for her she looks like and old crippled thing. On grass she's pretty good, but every other surface it's one step at a time.

My pea gravel has thinned out considerably, even with the cement wash out beneath it. It is more the texture of regular gravel where the horses are. In the barn yard it is still loose pea gravel, but it's only been what? 3 months and I feel I've "lost" a good portion of it.

I like it for the drainage qualities, as there is never any mud in the pea gravel area.
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GreatGotlands
GreatGotlands
36. RE: Pea Gravel
Aug 21 2009, 7:41 AM EDT | Post edited: Aug 21 2009, 8:36 AM EDT
"Well my tender foot mare I had posted about is worse than ever with wet season on us. She can hardly walk. So I'll probably break down and put front shoes on her at least. I feel horrible for her she looks like and old crippled thing. On grass she's pretty good, but every other surface it's one step at a time. "
Have you considered hoof boots? I have a few friends with foundered horses. Instead of shoes (which reduces blood flow and therefore feeling and growth) you can get a pair of boots for her. A good pair of boots can last up to 500+ miles for an endurance rider. I'm sure they'd last even longer for your mare, as she will not put on as many hard miles. Talking to one of my friends, she said they are a costly initial purchase, but they work out to less; as the boots will work on her founderd horse (doesn't do endurance with that one) for years. As opposed to reshoeing every 6 weeks. (it costs$125+ to shoe all around here). She has been using Easyboots on his two fronts for over two years now. The boots still look fine to me!

I'm considering getting a pair myself for endurance rides. The woman I lease my mare from won't let me shoe, even if I wnated to.

Jen
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GreatGotlands
GreatGotlands
37. RE: Pea Gravel
Aug 21 2009, 8:34 AM EDT | Post edited: Aug 21 2009, 8:34 AM EDT
What are you guys using as "pea gravel"? Here pea gravel is smooth round stones (like stones found in a riverbed) the size of peas (well, chickpeas). Some of the photos on the Pea Gravel page look like crushed limestone to me. We have lots of limestone quarries in my area (5 within 1/2 hour drive).

http://paddockparadise.wetpaint.com/page/Crusher+Run+at+Wildridge This looks to me like 1/4 or 3/4 inch "down" (crushed jagged limestone with fines - sandy stuff).

Spotted T's looks/ sounds more like 3/4" clean crushed limestone than our pea gravel. http://paddockparadise.wetpaint.com/page/Spotted+T%27s+Pea+Gravel

I would like to add some, but not sure what to order. Would I be better with smooth rounded pea gravel? Clean with no sand? Or crushed limestone (jagged edges) clean with no fines (packs less and moves A BIT underfoot)? Or crushed limestone (3/4" down) jagged edges with fines, which can pack down almost like cement (what people around here use for driveways)?

Hmm... what is the best bang for my buck?

My horses have pretty good feet. No soreness issues. I just want for trimming and conditioning their feet to rock/ hard surfaces. And to give a dry spot to stand!

Jen
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SpottedTApps
SpottedTApps
38. RE: Pea Gravel
Aug 21 2009, 9:32 AM EDT | Post edited: Aug 21 2009, 9:32 AM EDT
considered it, but not going to do boots. I don't need them for riding as she rides in soft dirt arenas 90% of the time. I need them for her day to day living on track. She can't get around. She is in pain. My farrier is a good friend and he will charge me about $40-50 for front shoes.

Oh, and I'm not a natural hoof person. I leave my horses barefoot as much as is feesibly possible, for financial reasons, but I don't have this belief that shoes are the devil. I've been in it too long and have seen what help a good shoe job can provide for a horse.

If I needed them for the occasional trail ride, I'd buy the boots, but not for her 24/7 life of living.
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tangledmanes
tangledmanes
39. RE: Pea Gravel
Aug 21 2009, 6:50 PM EDT | Post edited: Aug 21 2009, 6:50 PM EDT
"What are you guys using as "pea gravel"? Here pea gravel is smooth round stones (like stones found in a riverbed) the size of peas (well, chickpeas). Some of the photos on the Pea Gravel page look like crushed limestone to me. We have lots of limestone quarries in my area (5 within 1/2 hour drive).

My horses have pretty good feet. No soreness issues. I just want for trimming and conditioning their feet to rock/ hard surfaces. And to give a dry spot to stand!

Jen"
Photos of all kinds of gravel are encouraged on the Pea Gravel page, but you're right -- there is currently no true rounded pea gravel shown there yet. Wildridge has crusher run or "crush and run" which is generally used for driveways because it packs down with the fines in there. It tends to stay put a little better than the rounded pea gravel, and is good for wearing down the hooves but doesn't exfoliate the sole like pea gravel does. It also offers no extra support to the sole for a sore-footed horse. I am currently using crusher run on a 40-foot long strip of my track. Ally gets the most mileage on it because it leads to her feeder tray.

Pea gravel needs to be contained because it doesn't pack down. I plan to make a pea gravel zone somewhere on my track, with the road-building geofabric under it (which I dug up from under my run-in in NY and brought with me to AL). But for my taste, pea gravel needs to be deep enough to have some give to it, so would be difficult to keep in use along a track's entire gravelled area. I'm looking at making it a contained track feature, like my hoof pond is a contained feature.

I think driveway gravel may be the best bang for your buck. My horses's healthy hooves do not get the sharp rocks stuck in their feet. Contracted hooves or white line disease might want to avoid crusher run, but I think it's a useful surface for part of a track.

JoAnn
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